collections

Dolce & GabbanaSpring Summer 2015 Top 10 Collections of the Season

Runway Review
11/26/2014 Ed Kavishe/fashionwirepress.com

I have this life," said Stefano Gabbana backstage before Dolce & Gabbbana's catwalk show in Milan on Sunday afternoon. "I want to be happy. I want to eat tomatoes and pasta. I want to have passion."

It is this sense of La Dolce Vita – of family, femininity and food – that Dolce & Gabbana have sold for almost 30 years, taking aspects of Sicilian life as the starting point for each collection.

This season, the reference was particularly specific: the Spanish invasion of Sicily, which began in the 15th century. After a 200-year occupation, said Gabbana, "the Spanish left a lot of things: baroque, religion, colour, flowers". All were clearly visible in the collection, which merged a cheery, 1970s postcard vision of Spain with gloss, glamour and Sicilian religious motifs.

Models wore black matador-style jackets, fringed capes, flamenco-style layered polka-dot dresses and white bullfighter shirts tucked into satin, embellished bloomers. Shoes were embellished with rivets and gold hearts to ornate, sumptuous effect. One pair featured transparent heels, which opened up, like a confession box, to reveal a heart within.

Should the theme be unclear, one model had a pair of castanets in her hair – and there was more playfulness to come. Anna Wintour grinned broadly when models marched down the catwalk holding fashion dolls in perspex boxes. Dressed in typically Dolce & Gabbana black, tailored skirt suits with widow's veils and crucifix necklaces, the toys, said Gabbana, were "ironic and funny", inspired by princess dolls in the Disney store and those sold at train stations in 1950s Italy.

View Runway
11/26/2014 Ed Kavishe/fashionwirepress.com

I have this life," said Stefano Gabbana backstage before Dolce & Gabbbana's catwalk show in Milan on Sunday afternoon. "I want to be happy. I want to eat tomatoes and pasta. I want to have passion."

It is this sense of La Dolce Vita – of family, femininity and food – that Dolce & Gabbana have sold for almost 30 years, taking aspects of Sicilian life as the starting point for each collection.

This season, the reference was particularly specific: the Spanish invasion of Sicily, which began in the 15th century. After a 200-year occupation, said Gabbana, "the Spanish left a lot of things: baroque, religion, colour, flowers". All were clearly visible in the collection, which merged a cheery, 1970s postcard vision of Spain with gloss, glamour and Sicilian religious motifs.

Models wore black matador-style jackets, fringed capes, flamenco-style layered polka-dot dresses and white bullfighter shirts tucked into satin, embellished bloomers. Shoes were embellished with rivets and gold hearts to ornate, sumptuous effect. One pair featured transparent heels, which opened up, like a confession box, to reveal a heart within.

Should the theme be unclear, one model had a pair of castanets in her hair – and there was more playfulness to come. Anna Wintour grinned broadly when models marched down the catwalk holding fashion dolls in perspex boxes. Dressed in typically Dolce & Gabbana black, tailored skirt suits with widow's veils and crucifix necklaces, the toys, said Gabbana, were "ironic and funny", inspired by princess dolls in the Disney store and those sold at train stations in 1950s Italy.


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