collections

Jean Paul GaultierSpring Summer 2015 Paris

Runway Review
9/27/2014 Faith Cummings/fashionwirepress.com

Jean Paul Gaultier has been in the business of dressing us, captivating us, and making us merry for almost forty years. He is one of the arbiters of bringing street to high-fashion runways, as well as putting a new and quite eccentric spin on a whole host of fashion "rules". Gaultier gave as chic a touch as could be lent to Madonna's sultry cone bras and he gave an altogether new sense of timelessness to sailor stripes. Along the way, there were even more fun moments, amazing designs, and a flair for the dramatic wherever possible.

Spring marked the designer's last ready-to-wear collection, after announcing his decision to zero in on special projects, his perfume business, and haute couture. The latter has given him the avenue to truly give wings to all the things in his vivid imagination, so why not explore that? The demands of ready-to-wear aren't for the faint of heart today: if the funds aren't on hand, then the collections must be fruitful. Not to mention, the rapid speed that the industry calls for.

His latest show was the perfect farewell: outrageous and a true sight to behold. Aptly deemed the "Miss Jean Paul Gaultier" beauty contest, the runway extravaganza was staged at spacious theater The Grand Rex. Cameras were flashing and the energy and excitement were palpable, with a slew of designers in attendance: Alber Elbaz, Gareth Pugh, Pierre Cardin, and Alexander Wang. Style icon and avid Gaultier aficionado Catherine Deneuve also sat on the front row.

And then came the actual show. First up were models taking to the stage's grandiose staircase in a slew of T-shirts punctuated by sailor stripes. Variations ranged from corset molding to edgy and deconstructed. Then Spanish actress Rossy de Palma and journalist Alex Taylor led the assortment into campy and comical scenes.

The actual designs were broken up into different vignettes: black and white statement-making hats and scarf-tied necks paying homage to the former president of the Committees Miss France and Miss Europe, Genevieve de Fontenay; cornrows, logos, and sporty chic gear reminiscent of the Tour de France; transparent umbrellas, PVC, and damp hair for all those April showers; pared-down menswear-inspired suited looks for a twist on Le Smoking. Each ensemble had Gaultier's whimsical and cheeky handiwork at play.

Older models had their moment on the catwalk and even a few editor-inspired looks made a statement channeling Franca Sozzani, Carine Roitfeld, Babeth Dijan, Emmanuelle Alt, and Grace Coddington.

It was a simultaneously sad and sunny moment for fashion. No one wants to say goodbye to the cheer and adventure that is Gaultier ready-to-wear, but the legendary designer's reign is far from over. We're all waiting with bated breath to see what he does next.

View Runway
9/27/2014 Faith Cummings/fashionwirepress.com

Jean Paul Gaultier has been in the business of dressing us, captivating us, and making us merry for almost forty years. He is one of the arbiters of bringing street to high-fashion runways, as well as putting a new and quite eccentric spin on a whole host of fashion "rules". Gaultier gave as chic a touch as could be lent to Madonna's sultry cone bras and he gave an altogether new sense of timelessness to sailor stripes. Along the way, there were even more fun moments, amazing designs, and a flair for the dramatic wherever possible.

Spring marked the designer's last ready-to-wear collection, after announcing his decision to zero in on special projects, his perfume business, and haute couture. The latter has given him the avenue to truly give wings to all the things in his vivid imagination, so why not explore that? The demands of ready-to-wear aren't for the faint of heart today: if the funds aren't on hand, then the collections must be fruitful. Not to mention, the rapid speed that the industry calls for.

His latest show was the perfect farewell: outrageous and a true sight to behold. Aptly deemed the "Miss Jean Paul Gaultier" beauty contest, the runway extravaganza was staged at spacious theater The Grand Rex. Cameras were flashing and the energy and excitement were palpable, with a slew of designers in attendance: Alber Elbaz, Gareth Pugh, Pierre Cardin, and Alexander Wang. Style icon and avid Gaultier aficionado Catherine Deneuve also sat on the front row.

And then came the actual show. First up were models taking to the stage's grandiose staircase in a slew of T-shirts punctuated by sailor stripes. Variations ranged from corset molding to edgy and deconstructed. Then Spanish actress Rossy de Palma and journalist Alex Taylor led the assortment into campy and comical scenes.

The actual designs were broken up into different vignettes: black and white statement-making hats and scarf-tied necks paying homage to the former president of the Committees Miss France and Miss Europe, Genevieve de Fontenay; cornrows, logos, and sporty chic gear reminiscent of the Tour de France; transparent umbrellas, PVC, and damp hair for all those April showers; pared-down menswear-inspired suited looks for a twist on Le Smoking. Each ensemble had Gaultier's whimsical and cheeky handiwork at play.

Older models had their moment on the catwalk and even a few editor-inspired looks made a statement channeling Franca Sozzani, Carine Roitfeld, Babeth Dijan, Emmanuelle Alt, and Grace Coddington.

It was a simultaneously sad and sunny moment for fashion. No one wants to say goodbye to the cheer and adventure that is Gaultier ready-to-wear, but the legendary designer's reign is far from over. We're all waiting with bated breath to see what he does next.


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