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LacosteFall Winter 2014 New York

Runway Review
2/8/2014 Natalie Cantell

There was not a pastel polo shirt or tiny open-mouthed crocodile in sight as Lacoste once again delivered a fall collection that verged on the iconoclastic.

Quietly dissident yet forever nostalgic, Felipe Oliveira Baptista cast his gaze away from tennis attire and tipped his hat to a different moment in sportswear. The designer paid tribute to 1920s France, more specifically the golf course René Lacoste’s father-in-law was busy designing in the Basque region at the time. Vintage photos from the Chantaco provoked Baptista's creation of the club house-inspired range, which wooed without a hint of cliché (for one lone, forgivable diamond knit does not an argyle sweater make).

Head-to-toe single-hued looks were broken only by the silver hardware of belt buckles and sleek exposed zips. Burgundy was juxtaposed with complimentary looks in navy and a single punch of bold, red tailoring. Matching printed separates refreshed the palate and sang of the ‘70s before hemlines dropped below the knee and the organised prints inclined towards the angular. Accessories were designed for heading outdoors, waterproof hoods attached themselves to contrasting double-breasted peacoats while gloves appeared at one with matching sleeves.

Girls looked equally at ease whether in menswear-inspired over-sized coats or the occasionally more coquettish skirts, played down with chunky knitwear. Even juxtaposed with acutely casual varsity-style jackets and monogrammed sweatshirts, the clean lines of Baptista’s relaxed tailoring proved positively leisurely. This was a collection for a less flagrant game, athletic in attitude but decidedly restrained.

View Runway
2/8/2014 Natalie Cantell

There was not a pastel polo shirt or tiny open-mouthed crocodile in sight as Lacoste once again delivered a fall collection that verged on the iconoclastic.

Quietly dissident yet forever nostalgic, Felipe Oliveira Baptista cast his gaze away from tennis attire and tipped his hat to a different moment in sportswear. The designer paid tribute to 1920s France, more specifically the golf course René Lacoste’s father-in-law was busy designing in the Basque region at the time. Vintage photos from the Chantaco provoked Baptista's creation of the club house-inspired range, which wooed without a hint of cliché (for one lone, forgivable diamond knit does not an argyle sweater make).

Head-to-toe single-hued looks were broken only by the silver hardware of belt buckles and sleek exposed zips. Burgundy was juxtaposed with complimentary looks in navy and a single punch of bold, red tailoring. Matching printed separates refreshed the palate and sang of the ‘70s before hemlines dropped below the knee and the organised prints inclined towards the angular. Accessories were designed for heading outdoors, waterproof hoods attached themselves to contrasting double-breasted peacoats while gloves appeared at one with matching sleeves.

Girls looked equally at ease whether in menswear-inspired over-sized coats or the occasionally more coquettish skirts, played down with chunky knitwear. Even juxtaposed with acutely casual varsity-style jackets and monogrammed sweatshirts, the clean lines of Baptista’s relaxed tailoring proved positively leisurely. This was a collection for a less flagrant game, athletic in attitude but decidedly restrained.


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