collections

Nina RicciSpring Summer 2015 Paris

Runway Review
9/25/2014 TeamFWP

Five outstanding years at Nina Ricci's creative helm came to a close as Peter Copping presented his last collection for the French fashion house, before making an all-new place for himself over at Oscar de la Renta. The designer concluded his stretch at the brand in a positive and upbeat manner for Spring with an assortment of alluring and well thought-out designs that perfectly exuded the beauty and grace that has become his trademark, as well as being a Ricci cornerstone.

Copping borrowed a bit from the '40s with retro-inspired prim blouses, colorful pencil skirts, bustier-inspired tops, and easy yet functional knits. "Make Do and Mend" was the title of the collection and the concept of tailoring and giving a new spin to your most heavily-worn pieces during periods of difficulty coursed through the offerings: not very often the case for the kinds of women who have a taste for Nina Ricci.

Asymmetric necklines were purposely cut with a slight imperfection, fabrics were wrinkled at times to echo that worn look, ruffle detailing was uneven juxtaposing femininity with foible, and button-accented slits spoke to versatility. The unfinished hem and snap accents of a tweed, knee-length skirt was undone in the best sense of the word, while the asymmetric embellished overlay and bustle of a crisscross neckline gown combined glamour and expert construction seamlessly.

It was all about distinctive and distinguished details here: the rosy pink contrast lapels of a tuxedo-inspired dress which matched its lining, both raised and flat studs on a zip-front collarless gold leather jacket with short sleeves, petal embroidery turned inside out on a feminine frock, and diaphanous pencil skirts with thigh-high slits and exposed seam detailing. Tiny buttons on a boatneck knit were both whimsical and practical and lace insets on a high-waist skirt were cleverly sultry. The slight flare of a collarless coat felt like the Ricci we have always known and loved, while astutely placed lace tiers were simultaneously youthful and flirty.

Naturally, no woman who indulges in Nina Ricci has to worry about putting a new twist on her worn-out wardrobe, but the aim of the collection did have a handcrafted and authentic feel that was impossible to resist. Oscar de la Renta is striking it rich with Copping. This was a truly memorable farewell and a simultaneously exciting beginning.

View Runway
9/25/2014 TeamFWP

Five outstanding years at Nina Ricci's creative helm came to a close as Peter Copping presented his last collection for the French fashion house, before making an all-new place for himself over at Oscar de la Renta. The designer concluded his stretch at the brand in a positive and upbeat manner for Spring with an assortment of alluring and well thought-out designs that perfectly exuded the beauty and grace that has become his trademark, as well as being a Ricci cornerstone.

Copping borrowed a bit from the '40s with retro-inspired prim blouses, colorful pencil skirts, bustier-inspired tops, and easy yet functional knits. "Make Do and Mend" was the title of the collection and the concept of tailoring and giving a new spin to your most heavily-worn pieces during periods of difficulty coursed through the offerings: not very often the case for the kinds of women who have a taste for Nina Ricci.

Asymmetric necklines were purposely cut with a slight imperfection, fabrics were wrinkled at times to echo that worn look, ruffle detailing was uneven juxtaposing femininity with foible, and button-accented slits spoke to versatility. The unfinished hem and snap accents of a tweed, knee-length skirt was undone in the best sense of the word, while the asymmetric embellished overlay and bustle of a crisscross neckline gown combined glamour and expert construction seamlessly.

It was all about distinctive and distinguished details here: the rosy pink contrast lapels of a tuxedo-inspired dress which matched its lining, both raised and flat studs on a zip-front collarless gold leather jacket with short sleeves, petal embroidery turned inside out on a feminine frock, and diaphanous pencil skirts with thigh-high slits and exposed seam detailing. Tiny buttons on a boatneck knit were both whimsical and practical and lace insets on a high-waist skirt were cleverly sultry. The slight flare of a collarless coat felt like the Ricci we have always known and loved, while astutely placed lace tiers were simultaneously youthful and flirty.

Naturally, no woman who indulges in Nina Ricci has to worry about putting a new twist on her worn-out wardrobe, but the aim of the collection did have a handcrafted and authentic feel that was impossible to resist. Oscar de la Renta is striking it rich with Copping. This was a truly memorable farewell and a simultaneously exciting beginning.


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