collections

Paul SmithSpring Summer 2015 London

Runway Review
9/14/2014 Faith Cummings/fashionwirepress.com

Paul Smith exuded the gypsy and bohemian spirit of Stevie Nicks for his Fall collection, but jumped back to minimalism and clean lines for Spring: putting his own spin on the classics. Like many other brands this season thus far, stripes were a foundation for the offerings that went bold with a bit of fringe embellishment. The mood was carefree and nothing was overdone or excessive: it was all about simplicity and practicality.

The subdued and faded palette lent a timeless air to the assortment that was made even more harmonious with roomy totes, long line satin lapel vests, billowing tunics, and expertly-tailored blazers. It skewed a bit masculine (as have Smith's past lineups), though a bit of quintessential feminine flair was infused with a pleat-hem dress, wide waist cinchers, slinky fringe-detailed camis, and sheer blouses.

A white, navy, and blue floral print was sprawled across a silky single-breasted blazer, sleeveless dress with a sheer pleated skirt, a button-front blouse that felt pajama-like in its ease, and a mockneck tunic that could work perfectly with a pair of skinny black trousers for work or destructed denim for play. The more girlish looks were the ones that truly stood out amongst a sea of temperate ensembles.

Jackets were paired with bermuda shorts, crossbody bags, and slides for custom-fit simplicity while satin bomber jackets in camel and red and camel stripes were the only athletic-inspired moments in the offerings. Smith is known for his love of juxtaposing masculine and feminine elements and no look illustrated that better than a long printed jacket in the collection's main pattern, paired with an icy blue shirt dress: accessible, comfortable, and smooth.

The collection felt quintessentially Paul Smith, though it wasn't the most memorable from the world-renowned brand. It did bring us back to a time when minimalism was cherished and restraint was revered: not the things a showstopping selection is made of but surely the pieces a modern-day woman's wardrobe is yearning for

Edited by Ed Kavishe

View Runway
9/14/2014 Faith Cummings/fashionwirepress.com

Paul Smith exuded the gypsy and bohemian spirit of Stevie Nicks for his Fall collection, but jumped back to minimalism and clean lines for Spring: putting his own spin on the classics. Like many other brands this season thus far, stripes were a foundation for the offerings that went bold with a bit of fringe embellishment. The mood was carefree and nothing was overdone or excessive: it was all about simplicity and practicality.

The subdued and faded palette lent a timeless air to the assortment that was made even more harmonious with roomy totes, long line satin lapel vests, billowing tunics, and expertly-tailored blazers. It skewed a bit masculine (as have Smith's past lineups), though a bit of quintessential feminine flair was infused with a pleat-hem dress, wide waist cinchers, slinky fringe-detailed camis, and sheer blouses.

A white, navy, and blue floral print was sprawled across a silky single-breasted blazer, sleeveless dress with a sheer pleated skirt, a button-front blouse that felt pajama-like in its ease, and a mockneck tunic that could work perfectly with a pair of skinny black trousers for work or destructed denim for play. The more girlish looks were the ones that truly stood out amongst a sea of temperate ensembles.

Jackets were paired with bermuda shorts, crossbody bags, and slides for custom-fit simplicity while satin bomber jackets in camel and red and camel stripes were the only athletic-inspired moments in the offerings. Smith is known for his love of juxtaposing masculine and feminine elements and no look illustrated that better than a long printed jacket in the collection's main pattern, paired with an icy blue shirt dress: accessible, comfortable, and smooth.

The collection felt quintessentially Paul Smith, though it wasn't the most memorable from the world-renowned brand. It did bring us back to a time when minimalism was cherished and restraint was revered: not the things a showstopping selection is made of but surely the pieces a modern-day woman's wardrobe is yearning for

Edited by Ed Kavishe


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