collections

Peter PilottoSpring Summer 2015 London

Runway Review
9/15/2014 Faith Cummings/fashionwirepress.com

The fanciful folk art details and kaleidoscopic hues showed that there was an undeniable nod to the late 60's and early 70's for Peter Pilotto and Christopher de Vos' Spring collection for Peter Pilotto. In essence, we could definitely taste the rainbow. It came at a time when we all were sure the brand had gotten into their groove and had no desires to stray from it. This was a creative reset in which their silhouettes were immensely streamlined, allowing for a fresh modus operandi when it came to adornment and embroidery.

The assortment traveled back in time to the Summer of Love with a slew of A-line mini dresses in PVC, hallucinatory patterns, floral embroidery, and the season's requisite floral prints. Macramé straps, insets, and trim were at times hippie chic and sultry at others based on placement, while cutout detailing spoke to the aforementioned sexy spirit. Crackled, gleaming perspex comma motifs created a visual pause, giving way to richer hues. The lineup's colorful PVC sandals grounded the designs in modernity. It was all a trip: not the drug-induced kind but one could definitely see its influence.

There were more flowy moments with a black organza crop top and matching handkerchief skirt and a bevy of dresses showcasing the same skirt silhouette. A roomy, multi-hued blazer was paired with a stripe bottom with an undulating hem, while silk pleats and sequins were juxtaposed against one another on colorblocked jersey frocks: a bit disco in execution. Asymmetric sinuous bodices left little to the imagination with plunging necklines and sheer bottoms showed leg in a seductive, but not blatant way.

This period in time was all about music and no festival would be complete without a patchwork quilt. Their influence was channeled on organza and perspex laminated coats, for truly statement-making outerwear. Trousers were also thrown in the mix with high-waists, flared legs, flashy embroidery, and splashy stripes - paired with vibrant short-sleeve tops and crop tops.

The collection didn't pull from some intense inspiration, but they surely were a lot of fun. The kind of enjoyable and entertaining pieces women the world over cannot wait to wear, whether they are Pilotto fans or not. The whimsicality was the point as it was a result of the decoration and energetic hues at hand. Optically, there was a lot to digest, but it was surprising and refreshing to the see the brand switch it up and abandon their trademark digital prints altogether. It showed they have great range and that their customers and the industry shouldn't grow comfortable with what they've served up until this point: the mark of any truly great set of designers who value dynamism.

View Runway
9/15/2014 Faith Cummings/fashionwirepress.com

The fanciful folk art details and kaleidoscopic hues showed that there was an undeniable nod to the late 60's and early 70's for Peter Pilotto and Christopher de Vos' Spring collection for Peter Pilotto. In essence, we could definitely taste the rainbow. It came at a time when we all were sure the brand had gotten into their groove and had no desires to stray from it. This was a creative reset in which their silhouettes were immensely streamlined, allowing for a fresh modus operandi when it came to adornment and embroidery.

The assortment traveled back in time to the Summer of Love with a slew of A-line mini dresses in PVC, hallucinatory patterns, floral embroidery, and the season's requisite floral prints. Macramé straps, insets, and trim were at times hippie chic and sultry at others based on placement, while cutout detailing spoke to the aforementioned sexy spirit. Crackled, gleaming perspex comma motifs created a visual pause, giving way to richer hues. The lineup's colorful PVC sandals grounded the designs in modernity. It was all a trip: not the drug-induced kind but one could definitely see its influence.

There were more flowy moments with a black organza crop top and matching handkerchief skirt and a bevy of dresses showcasing the same skirt silhouette. A roomy, multi-hued blazer was paired with a stripe bottom with an undulating hem, while silk pleats and sequins were juxtaposed against one another on colorblocked jersey frocks: a bit disco in execution. Asymmetric sinuous bodices left little to the imagination with plunging necklines and sheer bottoms showed leg in a seductive, but not blatant way.

This period in time was all about music and no festival would be complete without a patchwork quilt. Their influence was channeled on organza and perspex laminated coats, for truly statement-making outerwear. Trousers were also thrown in the mix with high-waists, flared legs, flashy embroidery, and splashy stripes - paired with vibrant short-sleeve tops and crop tops.

The collection didn't pull from some intense inspiration, but they surely were a lot of fun. The kind of enjoyable and entertaining pieces women the world over cannot wait to wear, whether they are Pilotto fans or not. The whimsicality was the point as it was a result of the decoration and energetic hues at hand. Optically, there was a lot to digest, but it was surprising and refreshing to the see the brand switch it up and abandon their trademark digital prints altogether. It showed they have great range and that their customers and the industry shouldn't grow comfortable with what they've served up until this point: the mark of any truly great set of designers who value dynamism.


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