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RuffianFall Winter 2014 New York

Runway Review

27 shots in the collection

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2/8/2014 Ed Kavishe/fashionwirepress.com

One thing to be said for Ruffian’s AW14 collection, it had a sense of the dramatic. Designers Claude Morais and Brian Wold took their episcopal direction from Petrus Christus, a Bruges-based painter we can safely assume had even less of a sense of humor than the subjects of his mid-15th century portraits.

We might therefore declare the range appropriately stilted, if a touch literal; long, black priest-like robes were a feature, and the occasional Elizabethan collar took the reference to suffocating heights. The aesthetic continued to border on theatrical, bright red (and occasionally blue) stockings felt immature, a costume-like shock as they sat atop black shoes.

The standout print, sliced and diced, made for an appreciated twist, and the bomber-like jacket worn in the opening look showed particular promos - albeit of a direction the show never quite took.

To quote one particularly diplomatic answer to an awkward moment in television history, the collection simply didn’t feel very modern. While the heavy make-up was certainly a culprit (taking a more restrained cue from Christus’ Portrait of a Young Girl could have been an interesting approach) the styling also unfortunately seemed slightly off base. Amongst a haphazard collection, there were no doubt pieces that would have been championed under other circumstances.

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2/8/2014 Ed Kavishe/fashionwirepress.com

One thing to be said for Ruffian’s AW14 collection, it had a sense of the dramatic. Designers Claude Morais and Brian Wold took their episcopal direction from Petrus Christus, a Bruges-based painter we can safely assume had even less of a sense of humor than the subjects of his mid-15th century portraits.

We might therefore declare the range appropriately stilted, if a touch literal; long, black priest-like robes were a feature, and the occasional Elizabethan collar took the reference to suffocating heights. The aesthetic continued to border on theatrical, bright red (and occasionally blue) stockings felt immature, a costume-like shock as they sat atop black shoes.

The standout print, sliced and diced, made for an appreciated twist, and the bomber-like jacket worn in the opening look showed particular promos - albeit of a direction the show never quite took.

To quote one particularly diplomatic answer to an awkward moment in television history, the collection simply didn’t feel very modern. While the heavy make-up was certainly a culprit (taking a more restrained cue from Christus’ Portrait of a Young Girl could have been an interesting approach) the styling also unfortunately seemed slightly off base. Amongst a haphazard collection, there were no doubt pieces that would have been championed under other circumstances.


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